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Runic Dictionary

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Snorri Sturluson (SnSt)

13th century; volume 3; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

III. Háttatal (Ht) - 102

prose works

Háttatal — SnSt HtIII

Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1094.

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Skj: Snorri Sturluson: 2. Háttatal, 1222-23 (AII, 52-77, BII, 61-88)

SkP info: III, 1182

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

71 — SnSt Ht 71III

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2017, ‘Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal 71’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1182.

Slóð kann sneiðir
seima geima
hnigfák Haka
hleypa greypa,
hinns af hlunni
hesta festa
lætr leyfðr skati
langa ganga.

{Sneiðir seima} kann hleypa {hnigfák Haka} greypa slóð geima, leyfðr skati, hinns lætr {langa hesta festa} ganga af hlunni.

{The cutter of gold} [GENEROUS MAN] can make {the bucking horse of Haki <sea-king>} [SHIP] run across the rough track of the sea, the praised lord, the one who makes {long horses of moorings} [SHIPS] step off the launching roller.

Mss: R(51v), W(149) (SnE)

Readings: [1] sneiðir: ‘snæþir’ R, sneiða W    [3] Haka: corrected from hafa in scribal hand R

Editions: Skj: Snorri Sturluson, 2. Háttatal 71: AII, 71, BII, 81, Skald II, 44; SnE 1848-87, I, 686-9, III, 129, SnE 1879-81, I, 12, 82, II, 27, SnE 1931, 244, SnE 2007, 30; Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 44-5.

Context: The metre is called inn grœnlenzki háttr ‘the verse-form from Greenland’. The odd lines are structured similarly to the even lines in hagmælt ‘skilfully spoken’ (st. 70 above), and each even line consists of two disyllabic words (a long syllable plus a short enclitic ending). The internal rhymes in the even lines have been extended to include the second syllable as well.

Notes: [All]: For the rhyme scheme in the even lines of this stanza, see Kuhn (1983, 83). See also RvHbreiðm Hl 19-20, although those stanzas do not have internal rhyme in the odd lines. The metre is otherwise attested (without internal rhyme in the odd lines) in Anon (TGT) 14, 23 (see also st. 73 below). — [1] sneiðir ‘the cutter’: In R ‘snæþir’ (snæðir ‘the eater’ (?) or sneyðir ‘the depriver‘ (?)) has been altered to ‘sneiþir’ (R*). — [3] hnigfák Haka ‘the bucking horse of Haki <sea-king> [SHIP]’: As Faulkes (SnE 2007, 123: hnigfákr) points out, Fákr is the name of a horse in Skm (Anon Kálfv 1/4) and its rider is Haki (see SnE 1998, I, 89).

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