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Runic Dictionary

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Kálfr Hallsson (Kálf)

14th century; volume 7; ed. Kirsten Wolf;

Kátrínardrápa (Kátr) - 51

The name of the poet of Kátrínardrápa can be deduced from sts 1, 49 and 51 as Kálfr Hallsson (Kálfr would have been Kálfur in C14th). In st. 1/8 he describes himself as ‘the son of Hallur’ (arfi Halls) and at the end of the poem gives his name in both Icelandic (Kálfr [= ‘calf’] 49/1) and Lat. (Vitulus [= Kálfur] 51/3) and says he is now a monk (frater, st. 51/4). The implication of sts 45-51 is that Kálfr had previously led a sinful secular life, but this may be stereotypical self-deprecation. The Lat. phrase Vítulus vátes ‘the poet Kálfr’ by which the poet refers to himself in st. 51/3-4 also appears in Völsungs rímur hins óborna and this has led some scholars to propose that Kálfr Hallsson was the author of both poems (see Note to st. 51). Nothing is known of Kálfr’s monastic affiliation nor his precise dates, though the mid-C14th seems a likely floruit (Vésteinn Ólason 1993, 316).

Kátrínardrápa (‘Drápa about S. Catherine’) — Kálf KátrVII

Kirsten Wolf 2007, ‘(Introduction to) Kálfr Hallsson, Kátrínardrápa’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 931-64.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51 

Skj: [Anonyme digte og vers XIV]: [B. 11]. Katrínar drápa (AII, 516-26, BII, 569-82)

SkP info: VII, 936

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

6 — Kálf Kátr 6VII

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kirsten Wolf (ed.) 2007, ‘Kálfr Hallsson, Kátrínardrápa 6’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 936.

Blótin vildi bragningr láta
beldinn efla í sínu veldi
hvern þann brjót, er af honum girniz
heiðr að þiggja, orma leiðar.
Afarkostum liet ýtendr rastar
alla sæta skeljungs fjalla
glæstrar rekkju, ef gjöra ei treystaz,
glóða hreytir, Þór eða Óðni.

Beldinn bragningr vildi láta {hvern þann brjót {orma leiðar}}, er girniz að þiggja heiðr af honum, efla blótin í sínu veldi. {Hreytir {glóða rastar}} liet {alla ýtendr {glæstrar rekkju {skeljungs fjalla}}} sæta afarkostum, ef gjöra ei treystaz Þór eða Óðni.

The arrogant prince wanted to let {every breaker {of the serpent’s path}} [GOLD > GENEROUS MAN], who desires to obtain honour from him, strengthen the sacrifices in his country. {The distributer {of red-hot embers of the current}} [GOLD > GENEROUS MAN] let {all the offerers {of the shining bed {of the whale of the mountains}}} [SNAKE > GOLD > GENEROUS MEN] be exposed to hard conditions, if they did not trust Þórr or Óðinn.

Mss: 713(129), 399a-bˣ(4), 920ˣ(213v)

Readings: [1] bragningr: bragning all    [8] hreytir: hreyti all

Editions: Skj: [Anonyme digte og vers XIV], [B. 11]. Katrínar drápa 6: AII, 517-18, BII, 570, Skald II, 313; NN §2958A, Kahle 1898, 68, 105-6, Sperber 1911, 44, 79.

Notes: [All]: The substance of this st. is based loosely on the prose saga (Unger 1877, I, 400-1; Wolf 2003, 123-4), but the pre-Christian Norse gods Þórr and Óðinn are not specifically mentioned. — [1] bragningr ‘prince’: Kock (NN §2958A, Skald) uses bragning based on a ‘rule’ he invented, but the rule is not tenable.

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