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Einarr þambarskelfir Eindriðason (Eþsk)

volume 1; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

Couplet (Couplet) - 1

Einarr þambarskelfir ‘Paunch-shaker’ (?) Eindriðason (Eþsk; c. 987-1051/52) was one of the most powerful Norwegian district chieftains of his time. At the age of thirteen, he participated in the naval battle of Svǫlðr (c. 1000), fighting alongside King Óláfr Tryggvason on Óláfr’s ship, the famous Ormr inn langi (‘the Long Serpent’). Subsequently, he served as the adviser and regent to Óláfr Haraldsson’s young son, Magnús inn góði ‘the Good’ (r. 1035-47). After Magnús’s death, Einarr became a district chieftain of King Haraldr harðráði ‘Hard-rule’ Sigurðarson, but their relationship turned sour (see Hharð Lv 6-7II). Eventually Einarr and his son Eindriði were ambushed and killed by King Haraldr and his men in Trondheim, c. 1051/52. The meaning of Einarr’s nickname þambarskelfir is possibly ‘Paunch-shaker’, but has been much debated: see Gade (1995b), Gade (1995c), Sayers (1995) and Liberman (1996). Other than the couplet below, no poetry is attributed to Einarr.

notes
Kock, Skald. I 79

Couplet — Eþsk CoupletI

Kari Ellen Gade 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Einarr þambarskelfir Eindriðason, Couplet’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 452.

stanzas:  1 

in texts: Hkr, ÓT

SkP info: I, 452

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance references search files

 

1 Vol. 1. 31. Einarr þambarskelfir Eindriðason, Couplet, 1 [Vol. 1, 452] — Eþsk Couplet 1I

The following text is from a superseded edition and is not the work of the editor(s) named on this page. It is included for reference only. Do not refer to this site when using this text but rather consult the original edition (Skj where relevant).

Ofveikr, ofveikr
allvalds boginn!

Skj: Not in Skj; fornyrðislag; ed. KEG; group: A2; mss: 325VIII 1, 53, 54, 61, Bb, F, Flat, J1x, J2x, Kx; texts: ÓT 59
 
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