This interface will soon cease to be publicly available. Use the new interface instead. Click here to switch over now.

Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Runic Dictionary

login: password: stay logged in: help

Óláfr hvítaskáld Þórðarson (Ólhv)

13th century; volume 2; ed. Lauren Goetting;

prose works

The Third Grammatical Treatise (TGT) - 330

Óláfr hvítaskáld ‘White Skald’ Þórðarson (Ólhv) was an accomplished Icel. scholar and a prolific poet. Details of his life are documented in Sturlunga saga (Stu), Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar (Hák), and Knýtlinga saga (Knýtl). He was born c. 1210-12 at Staður on Snæfellsness, Iceland, as the eldest son of Þórðr Sturluson and his concubine Þóra. He was the nephew of Snorri Sturluson (SnSt; d. 1241), with whom he spent long periods of time as a young man, and the older brother of Sturla Þórðarson (Sturl; d. 1284). In 1237 he left Iceland with Snorri to embark upon a career as a professional poet at the courts of Scandinavia. According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 256-8, 260, 378-84) Óláfr composed poetry in honour of a large number of kings and noblemen, including the following: (in Norway) Jarl Skúli Bárðarson (d. 1240), King Hákon Hákonarson (d. 1263) and his son Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257), Jarl Knútr Hákonarson (d. 1261); (in Sweden) King Eiríkr Eiríkson (d. 1250); (in Denmark) King Valdimarr Valdimarsson (d. 1241). Because of Óláfr’s close association with Valdimarr, from whom he hafði ... margar ágætligar frásagnir ‘got ... many excellent narratives’ (ÍF 35, 315), he is thought by some to have written Knýtl, which recounts the history of Dan. rulers (see LH 1894-1901, II, 275, 784-5). Around 1242 Óláfr returned to Iceland and founded a school at Stafaholt in Borgarfjörður, where he wrote the Third Grammatical Treatise (TGT) and devoted himself to teaching and writing until his death in 1259. In addition to these pursuits, he was ordained subdeacon at some point after his return to Iceland and also served as lawspeaker 1248-50.

Most of Óláfr’s extant poetry consists of encomia to King Hákon Hákonarson and is inserted throughout the prose in Hák. This includes part of Hrynhenda (Ólhv Hryn), one st. from a Poem about Hákon (Ólhv Hák), and two lvv. (Ólhv Lv). One lv. traditionally assigned to him, has been reassigned in the present edn to Óláfr svartaskáld Leggsson (Ólsv Love 3III). Aside from the aforementioned, the remainder of Óláfr’s known poetic works includes two sts from ÁrónsdrápaDrápa about Árón’ (Ólhv ÁrdrIV), composed about his friend Árón Hjǫrleifsson, and two sts from ThómasdrápaDrápa about Thomas (ꜳ Becket)’ (Ólhv ThómdrIII), recorded in the Fourth Grammatical Treatise (FoGT). Finally, nine fragments of sts from TGT (Ólhv FragIII), treated as anonymous in previous eds, are attributed to Óláfr in this edn.

The Third Grammatical TreatiseTGT

(forthcoming), ‘ Óláfr hvítaskáld Þórðarson, The Third Grammatical Treatise’ in Tarrin Wills (ed.), The Third Grammatical Treatise. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. . <https://skaldic.org/m.php?p=text&i=32> (accessed 29 November 2021)

segments:  1.   1.1   1.2   1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6   1.7   1.8   1.9   1.10   1.11   1.12   1.13   1.14   1.15   1.16   1.17   1.18   1.19   1.20   2.   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   2.5   2.6   2.7   2.8   2.9   2.10   2.11   2.12   2.13   2.14   2.15   2.16   2.17   2.18   2.19   3.   3.1   3.2   3.3   3.4   3.5   3.6   3.7   3.8   3.9   3.10   3.11   3.12   3.13   3.14   3.15   3.16   3.17   3.18   3.19   3.20   3.21   4.   4.1   4.2   4.3   4.4   4.5   4.6   4.7   4.8   4.9   4.10   4.11   4.12   4.13   4.14   4.15   4.16   4.17   4.18   4.19   5.   5.1   5.2   5.3   5.4   5.5   5.6   5.7   5.8   5.9   5.10   5.11   6.   6.1   6.2   6.3   6.4   6.5   6.6   6.7   7.   7.1   7.2   7.3   7.4   7.5   7.6   8.   8.1   8.2   8.3   8.4   8.5   8.6   8.7   8.8   9.   9.1   9.2   9.3   9.4   9.5   9.6   9.7   9.8   9.9   9.10   9.11   10.   10.1   10.2   10.3   10.4   11.   11.1   11.2   11.3   11.4   11.5   11.6   11.7   11.8   11.9   11.10   11.11   11.12   11.13   11.14   11.15   11.16   11.17   11.18   11.19   11.20   11.21   11.22   11.23   11.24   11.25   11.26   11.27   11.28   11.29   11.30   11.31   12.   12.1   12.2   12.3   12.4   12.5   12.6   12.7   12.8   12.9   12.10   12.11   12.12   12.13   12.14   12.15   12.16   12.17   13.   13.1   13.2   13.3   13.4   13.5   13.6   13.7   13.8   13.9   13.10   13.11   13.12   13.13   13.14   13.15   13.16   13.17   13.18   13.19   13.20   14.   14.1   14.2   14.3   14.4   14.5   14.6   14.7   14.8   14.9   14.10   14.11   14.12   14.13   14.14   14.15   14.16   15.   15.1   15.2   15.3   15.4   15.5   15.6   15.7   15.8   15.9   15.10   15.11   15.12   15.13   15.14   15.15   15.16   15.17   15.18   15.19   15.20   15.21   15.22   15.23   15.24   15.25   15.26   15.27   15.28   15.29   16.   16.1   16.2   16.3   16.4   16.5   16.6   16.7   16.8   16.9   16.10   16.11   16.12   16.13   16.14   16.15   16.16   16.17   16.18   16.19   16.20   16.21   16.22   16.23   16.24   16.25   16.26   16.27   16.28   16.29   16.30   16.31   16.32   16.33   16.34   16.35   16.36   16.37   16.38   16.39   16.40   16.41   16.42   16.43   16.44   16.45   16.46   16.47   16.48   16.49   16.50   16.51   16.52   16.53   16.54   16.55   16.56   16.57   16.58   16.59   16.60   16.61   16.62   16.63   16.64   16.65   16.66   16.67   16.68   16.69   16.70   16.71   16.72   16.73   16.74   16.75 

76 — Ólhv, TGT §4.12

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references grammar quiz

 

The following text is from a superseded edition and is not the work of the editor(s) named on this page. It is included for reference only. Do not refer to this site when using this text but rather consult the original edition (Skj where relevant).

Sumir raddarstafir eru fyrir skipaðir í samanlímingu sem a ok e, en sumir eptir skipaðir sem e ok i, o ok u, ok eru þeir raddarstafir náttúruliga fyrir skipaðir í samanlímingum, er nálægra hafa hljóð hinu inzta raddartóli mannsins, en hinir eptir skipaðir, er nærri standa í hljóðsgrein efni raddarinnar, sem a fyrir e ok u, en e fyrir i ok o ok u, þvíat þat hljóð er grannara, er nær stendr brjóstinu ok fyrr tekz, en hitt digrara er framarr skapaz ok meira hefir rúm, er ok hœgra þat hljóð fyrri at setja í samanlímingu er fyrri skapaz en hitt eptir er síðar formeraz.

(Some vowels come first in conglutination like a and e, and some come second like e and i, o and u, and those vowels which have a sound closest to the innermost of human speech organs naturally come first in conglutination, and those which are closest in sound to the substance of voice come second, like a before e and u, and e before i and o and u, because that sound is finer, which is close to the breast and occurs first, than the thicker sound which is created further forward in the mouth and has more space; it is also easier to place the sound which is created first at the start of the conglutination and that one following, which is formed later. )

editions: Skj Not in Skj;

sources

AM 748 I b 4° (A) 2v, 29 - 2v, 35 (Gramm)  transcr.  image  image  
AM 242 fol (W) 97, 16 - 97, 22 (Gramm)  transcr.  image  image  image  
© 2008-