This interface will soon cease to be publicly available. Use the new interface instead. Click here to switch over now.

Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas

login: password: stay logged in: help

Óláfr hvítaskáld Þórðarson (Ólhv)

13th century; volume 2; ed. Lauren Goetting;

prose works

The Third Grammatical Treatise (TGT) - 330

Óláfr hvítaskáld ‘White Skald’ Þórðarson (Ólhv) was an accomplished Icel. scholar and a prolific poet. Details of his life are documented in Sturlunga saga (Stu), Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar (Hák), and Knýtlinga saga (Knýtl). He was born c. 1210-12 at Staður on Snæfellsness, Iceland, as the eldest son of Þórðr Sturluson and his concubine Þóra. He was the nephew of Snorri Sturluson (SnSt; d. 1241), with whom he spent long periods of time as a young man, and the older brother of Sturla Þórðarson (Sturl; d. 1284). In 1237 he left Iceland with Snorri to embark upon a career as a professional poet at the courts of Scandinavia. According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 256-8, 260, 378-84) Óláfr composed poetry in honour of a large number of kings and noblemen, including the following: (in Norway) Jarl Skúli Bárðarson (d. 1240), King Hákon Hákonarson (d. 1263) and his son Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257), Jarl Knútr Hákonarson (d. 1261); (in Sweden) King Eiríkr Eiríkson (d. 1250); (in Denmark) King Valdimarr Valdimarsson (d. 1241). Because of Óláfr’s close association with Valdimarr, from whom he hafði ... margar ágætligar frásagnir ‘got ... many excellent narratives’ (ÍF 35, 315), he is thought by some to have written Knýtl, which recounts the history of Dan. rulers (see LH 1894-1901, II, 275, 784-5). Around 1242 Óláfr returned to Iceland and founded a school at Stafaholt in Borgarfjörður, where he wrote the Third Grammatical Treatise (TGT) and devoted himself to teaching and writing until his death in 1259. In addition to these pursuits, he was ordained subdeacon at some point after his return to Iceland and also served as lawspeaker 1248-50.

Most of Óláfr’s extant poetry consists of encomia to King Hákon Hákonarson and is inserted throughout the prose in Hák. This includes part of Hrynhenda (Ólhv Hryn), one st. from a Poem about Hákon (Ólhv Hák), and two lvv. (Ólhv Lv). One lv. traditionally assigned to him, has been reassigned in the present edn to Óláfr svartaskáld Leggsson (Ólsv Love 3III). Aside from the aforementioned, the remainder of Óláfr’s known poetic works includes two sts from ÁrónsdrápaDrápa about Árón’ (Ólhv ÁrdrIV), composed about his friend Árón Hjǫrleifsson, and two sts from ThómasdrápaDrápa about Thomas (ꜳ Becket)’ (Ólhv ThómdrIII), recorded in the Fourth Grammatical Treatise (FoGT). Finally, nine fragments of sts from TGT (Ólhv FragIII), treated as anonymous in previous eds, are attributed to Óláfr in this edn.

The Third Grammatical TreatiseTGT

Tarrin Wills 2017, ‘The Third Grammatical Treatise’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].

segments:  1.   1.1   1.2   1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6   1.7   1.8   1.9   1.10   1.11   1.12   1.13   1.14   1.15   1.16   1.17   1.18   1.19   1.20   2.   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   2.5   2.6   2.7   2.8   2.9   2.10   2.11   2.12   2.13   2.14   2.15   2.16   2.17   2.18   2.19   3.   3.1   3.2   3.3   3.4   3.5   3.6   3.7   3.8   3.9   3.10   3.11   3.12   3.13   3.14   3.15   3.16   3.17   3.18   3.19   3.20   3.21   4.   4.1   4.2   4.3   4.4   4.5   4.6   4.7   4.8   4.9   4.10   4.11   4.12   4.13   4.14   4.15   4.16   4.17   4.18   4.19   5.   5.1   5.2   5.3   5.4   5.5   5.6   5.7   5.8   5.9   5.10   5.11   6.   6.1   6.2   6.3   6.4   6.5   6.6   6.7   7.   7.1   7.2   7.3   7.4   7.5   7.6   8.   8.1   8.2   8.3   8.4   8.5   8.6   8.7   8.8   9.   9.1   9.2   9.3   9.4   9.5   9.6   9.7   9.8   9.9   9.10   9.11   10.   10.1   10.2   10.3   10.4   11.   11.1   11.2   11.3   11.4   11.5   11.6   11.7   11.8   11.9   11.10   11.11   11.12   11.13   11.14   11.15   11.16   11.17   11.18   11.19   11.20   11.21   11.22   11.23   11.24   11.25   11.26   11.27   11.28   11.29   11.30   11.31   12.   12.1   12.2   12.3   12.4   12.5   12.6   12.7   12.8   12.9   12.10   12.11   12.12   12.13   12.14   12.15   12.16   12.17   13.   13.1   13.2   13.3   13.4   13.5   13.6   13.7   13.8   13.9   13.10   13.11   13.12   13.13   13.14   13.15   13.16   13.17   13.18   13.19   13.20   14.   14.1   14.2   14.3   14.4   14.5   14.6   14.7   14.8   14.9   14.10   14.11   14.12   14.13   14.14   14.15   14.16   15.   15.1   15.2   15.3   15.4   15.5   15.6   15.7   15.8   15.9   15.10   15.11   15.12   15.13   15.14   15.15   15.16   15.17   15.18   15.19   15.20   15.21   15.22   15.23   15.24   15.25   15.26   15.27   15.28   15.29   16.   16.1   16.2   16.3   16.4   16.5   16.6   16.7   16.8   16.9   16.10   16.11   16.12   16.13   16.14   16.15   16.16   16.17   16.18   16.19   16.20   16.21   16.22   16.23   16.24   16.25   16.26   16.27   16.28   16.29   16.30   16.31   16.32   16.33   16.34   16.35   16.36   16.37   16.38   16.39   16.40   16.41   16.42   16.43   16.44   16.45   16.46   16.47   16.48   16.49   16.50   16.51   16.52   16.53   16.54   16.55   16.56   16.57   16.58   16.59   16.60   16.61   16.62   16.63   16.64   16.65   16.66   16.67   16.68   16.69   16.70   16.71   16.72   16.73   16.74   16.75 

9 — Ólhv, TGT §1.8

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance grammar quiz

 

Cite as: Not published: do not cite (Ólhv, TGT §1.8)

Hljóð þat, er verðr af líflausum hlutum, er sumt ógreiniligt ⟨sem vinda gnýr eða vatna þytr eða reiðar þrumur, en sumt hljóð er greiniligt⟩ eptir náttúruligri samhljóðan, þeiri er philosophi kǫlluðu músikám; ok verðr þat hljóð hit efsta ok hit æzta af hrœring hringa þeira sjau, er sól ok tungl ok fimm merkistjǫrnur ganga í, þær er planetae eru kallaðar, ok heitir þat caelestis harmonia eða himnesk hljóðagrein. Þessar stjǫrnur sagði Plato hafa líf ok skyn ok vera ódauðligar.

 

The sound which comes from unliving things is sometimes indistict, like the noise of winds or the roaring of waters or the rumble of thunder, but sometimes sound is distinguishable according to natural consonance, which philosophers called music; and the most sublime and noble sound comes from the movement of the seven spheres in which the sun and moon and five marking stars travel, those which are called planets, and that is called caelestis harmonia or heavenly harmony. These stars, Plato said, have life and reason and are eternal.

notes: [Parallels]: 2GT: Svá þat ok, er viðir brotna eða vápnin mætast; þetta heita brak eða brestir, eða enn, sem áðr er ritað. Allt eru þetta vitlaus hljóð. En hér umfram er þat hljóð, er stafi eina skortir til máls: þat gera hörpurnar ok enn heldr hin meiri söngfæri; en þat heitir söngr. ‘Likewise that of trees breaking or of weapons clashing; this is called creak or clash or, again, as written above. These are all irrational sounds. In addition, there is that sound for which letters alone are not sufficient to (make a) discourse: this is (the sound) made by harps and, still more (distinctly), by the major musical instruments; it is called music.’ (Raschellà 1982, 50-51).

editions: Skj Not in Skj; SnE 1818, 298, SnE 1848, 173-4, SnE 1848-87, II, 398TGT 1884, 34TGT 1927, 21, TGT 1998, 42, TGT 2001, 76.

sources

AM 748 I b 4° (A) 1r, 21 - 1r, 26 (GrammSkáld)  transcr.  image  image  
AM 242 fol (W) 94, 18 - 94, 23 (Gramm)  transcr.  image  image  image  
AM 757 a 4° (B) 1r, 10 - 1r, 14 (TGT)  transcr.  image  image  image  image  
AM 757 b 4° (w) 1v, 1 - 1v, 11 (Gramm)  transcr.  image  
Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated