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Eyjólfr dáðaskáld (Edáð)

11th century; volume 1; ed. Russell Poole;

Bandadrápa (Banddr) - 9

Eyjólfr dáðaskáld (Edáð) is named among the skalds of Eiríkr jarl Hákonarson of Hlaðir (Lade) in the text of Skáldatal in ms. 761aˣ (SnE 1848-87, III, 256). The U text numbers him among the skalds of Sveinn jarl Hákonarson but not Eiríkr (ibid., 266); this, however, is without corroboration from other sources and probably due to a simple error of transposition (though see Ohlmarks 1958, 145). Eyjólfr’s nickname may derive from his poetry in praise of the dáðir ‘deeds’ of Eiríkr jarl (ÍF 26, 249 n. 1), whose career spanned the late tenth and early eleventh centuries. No traces of poetry by Eyjólfr concerning any other rulers survive and nothing is otherwise known about his life or lineage.

 

Bandadrápa (‘Drápa of the gods’) — Edáð BanddrI

Russell Poole 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Eyjólfr dáðaskáld, Bandadrápa’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 454.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9 

Skj: Eyjólfr dáðaskáld: Bandadrápa, omkr. 1010 (AI, 200-2, BI, 190-2)

SkP info: I, 461

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

4 — Edáð Banddr 4I

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Russell Poole (ed.) 2012, ‘Eyjólfr dáðaskáld, Bandadrápa 4’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 461.

Mærr vann miklu fleiri
malmhríð jǫfurr síðan
— áðr frôgum þat — aðra,
Eirekr und sik geira.
þás garð-Váli gerði
Gotlands vala strandir
Virfils vítt of herjat.
Veðrmildr ok semr hildi.

 

The renowned leader then fought {many more other metal-storms}, [BATTLES] — we [I] learned that earlierEiríkr under himself of spearswhen {the Váli {of the enclosure {of the horses of Virfill}}} [(lit. ‘enclosure-Váli of the horses of Virfill’) SHIPS > SHIELD > WARRIOR] had the coasts of Gotland raided far and wide. Storm-generous and contrives warfare

context: According to Hkr (similarly ÓT), Eiríkr, now based in Sweden, gains the support of Norwegians fleeing from Óláfr Tryggvason and undertakes raiding expeditions to Gotland so as to build up resources.

notes: Lines 4 and 8 belong to the klofastef ‘split refrain’ and stand outside the syntax of the stanza; see st. 9 and Notes. — [5-7]: The text as it stands in the mss is difficult. There seems to be a clear statement that Eiríkr raided Gotland, but the mss differ as to whether strandir Gotlands ‘the coasts of Gotland’ belong together. The remaining nominal elements might well form a kenning for ‘man’, ‘warrior’ or ‘ruler’ as grammatical subject, but the base-word is elusive and other elements ambiguous, especially the duplicated vala (ll. 5, 6). The problems are hardly to be solved without emendation (cf. Jón Þorkelsson 1884, 60). (a) Adopted in this edn is the solution reached by Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B). This involves emendation of ‘vala’ in l. 5 to Váli, while vala in l. 6 is interpreted as gen. pl. of valr, a heiti for ‘horse’. Though not attested elsewhere in skaldic poetry, the god’s name Váli occurs in eddic poetry (LP: Váli 1) and is probably ancient (McKinnell 2009a, 190-1). (b) Kock (NN §553) points out that only the elements garð(r) ‘enclosure’ and Virfils ‘of Virfill <sea-king>’ are needed for the shield-kenning, which he appears to combine with Finnur Jónsson’s Váli to form a warrior-kenning. Kennings for ‘shield’ with the base-word garðr are exemplified in Eskál Vell 14/7, 8 and 27/2, and the combination with Virfils is possible, though the name of a legendary hero would be more usual: cf. Meissner 170-2. Kock takes l. 6 as a single phrase, Gotlands Vala strandir, which he translates as gotlänningarnas stränder ‘shores of the Gotlanders’. He does not explain gen. pl. Vala, but presumably takes it as a generalised application of the ethnic name Valir, often used of the Franks. Such a phrase would, however, be unparalleled. (c) Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson in ÍF 26, while acknowledging that the helmingr can barely be interpreted, likewise starts with garð- Virfils ‘shield’, suggesting that its vǫlr ‘staff/stave’ (represented by vala in l. 5) might be ‘sword’. (d) Hkr 1991 tentatively suggests that vala in l. 6 represents an indeclinable adj., equivalent to einvala ‘choice, excellent’ and describing the Gotland coast.

texts: Flat 367, ÓT 151, ÓTC 46 (I 149), Hkr 177 (I 149)

editions: Skj Eyjólfr dáðaskáld: Bandadrápa 4 (AI, 200-1; BI, 191); Skald I, 101, NN §553; Hkr 1893-1901, I, 415-6, IV, 93, ÍF 26, 337-8, Hkr 1991, I, 229 (ÓTHkr ch. 89), F 1871, 153; Fms 2, 288, Fms 12, 55-6, ÓT 1958-2000, II, 242 (ch. 243), Flat 1860-8, I, 519.

sources

AM 35 folx (Kx) 199r, 24 - 199v, 4 (Hkr)  transcr.  image  image  
AM 45 fol (F) 34ra, 9 - 34ra, 13 (Hkr)  transcr.  image  image  image  image  
AM 38 folx (J2x) 108v, 15 - 108v, 22 (Hkr)  image  
AM 37 folx (J1x) 122v, 6 - 122v, 10 (Hkr)  transcr.  image  
AM 38 folx (J2x) 108v - 108v (Hkr)  image  
AM 61 fol (61) 65rb, 24 - 65rb, 27 (ÓT)  transcr.  image  image  
AM 53 fol (53) 62ra, 24 - 62ra, 28 (ÓT)  transcr.  image  
AM 54 fol (54) 60va, 4 - 60va, 8 (ÓT)  transcr.  image  
Holm perg 1 fol (Bb) 96ra, 28 - 96ra, 32 (ÓT)  transcr.  image  
GKS 1005 fol (Flat) 69rb, 33 - 69rb, 36 (ÓT)  transcr.  image  image  image  
Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated