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Anonymous Poems (Anon)

VII. Hugsvinnsmál (Hsv) - 151

Hugsvinnsmál (‘Sayings of the Wise-Minded One’) — Anon HsvVII

Tarrin Wills and Stefanie Gropper 2007, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Hugsvinnsmál’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 358-449.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149 

for reference only:  56x   65x 

Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII]: [C. E/5]. Hugsvinnsmál, Isl. oversættelse af Catonis Disticha. (AII, 167-97, BII, 185-210); stanzas (if different): 51/1-3, 67/1-3 | 52 | 53/4-6 | 53/1-3, 51/4-6 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 66 | 67 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78/1-3 | 78 [var], 78/4-6 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 146 | 147 | 148

SkP info: VII, 417-18

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

96 — Anon Hsv 96VII

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Tarrin Wills and Stefanie Gropper (eds) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Hugsvinnsmál 96’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 417-18.

Aura tjón        skal maðr eigi illa bera,
        þótt honum verði skapaðr skaði;
hitt hann huggar,
        ef hann halda má:
        sæll er, sá er sínu unir.

Maðr skal eigi illa bera aura tjón, þótt verði skapaðr skaði honum; hitt huggar hann, ef hann má halda; sæll er, sá er unir sínu.

A man must not bear badly the loss of his wealth, although it may cause harm for him; what [remains] will comfort him, if he can keep it; he is fortunate who is content with what he has.

Mss: 1199ˣ(74r)

Editions: Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII], [C. E/5]. Hugsvinnsmál 136: AII, 195, BII, 208, Skald II, 109; Hallgrímur Scheving 1831, 31, Gering 1907, 37, Tuvestrand 1977, 125, Hermann Pálsson 1985, 95.

Notes: [All]: Lat. parallels: (Dist. III, 11) Rebus et in censu si non est quod fuit ante, / fac vivas contentus eo, quod tempora praebent ‘If in goods and income things are not what they were, see that you live happy with that which the times offer’; (Dist. IV, 35) Ereptis opibus noli maerere dolendo / sed gaude potius, tibi si contingat habere ‘Do not bewail grieving over stolen goods, rather be happy, if it happens that you have something [left]’. Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) takes the latter distich as the primary parallel and consequently includes this st. after his st. 135 (translating Dist. IV, 34). — [6]: This l. seems to be a variant of a common saying in Icel. Cf. Hávm 9/1-3 (NK, 18): Sá er sæll, | er siálfr um á | lof oc vit, meðan lifir ‘That man is fortunate who, in himself, keeps his reputation and wits while he lives’ (Larrington 1996, 15). There is similar phrasing in Sól 49.

Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated