Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Bǫðvarr balti (Balti)

12th century; volume 2; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

Sigurðardrápa (Sigdr) - 4

Skj info: Bǫðvarr balti, Islandsk skjald, 12. årh. (AI, 504-5, BI, 476-7).

Skj poems:
Sigurðardrápa

Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 255, 263, 277) lists Bǫðvarr balti ‘Bear’ (Balti) among the poets of Sigurðr munnr ‘Mouth’ Haraldsson (d. 1155; see ‘Royal Biographies’ in Introduction to this vol.), but he is otherwise unknown. His nickname is given as halti ‘the Lame’ in Mork (see Introduction below), but that must be a scribal error because both Skáldatal and ms. U of SnE agree on balti. We do not know whether Bǫðvarr was from Iceland or Norway.

Sigurðardrápa (‘Drápa about Sigurðr’) — Balti SigdrII

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Bǫðvarr balti, Sigurðardrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 533-6.

 1   2   3   4 

Skj: Bǫðvarr balti: Sigurðardrápa, o. 1150 (AI, 504-5, BI, 477-8)

SkP info: II, 534-5

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

2 — Balti Sigdr 2II

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Bǫðvarr balti, Sigurðardrápa 2’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 534-5.

Magnús varð (at morði)
málsnjallr í bǫð falla
(réð fyr ræsis dauða
ríkr þjóðkonungr slíkum).
Meir rak þik til þeira,
þreksterkr konungr, verka
— flagðs hest hafið flestan
fylldan — nauðr, an skyldi.

Málsnjallr Magnús varð falla í bǫð; ríkr þjóðkonungr réð fyr slíkum dauða ræsis at morði. Þreksterkr konungr, meir nauðr, an skyldi, rak þik til þeira verka; hafið fylldan {flestan hest flagðs}.

Eloquent Magnús had to fall in battle; the powerful, mighty king caused such a death of the ruler during the onslaught. Courage-strong king, a greater need than should have been [necessary] forced you into those deeds; you have sated {many a horse of the troll-woman} [WOLF].

Mss: Mork(35r) (Mork)

Readings: [7] flestan: flestum Mork    [8] fylldan: fylldum Mork

Editions: Skj: Bǫðvarr balti, Sigurðardrápa 2: AI, 504, BI, 478, Skald I, 234, NN §972B; Mork 1867, 222, Mork 1928-32, 439, Andersson and Gade 2000, 388, 494 (Sslemb).

Context: As st. 1 above.

Notes: [1] Magnús: Magnús inn blindi Sigurðarson (see Context to st. 1 above). For Magnús’s death and his last words, see Note to Ív Sig 39 [All]. — [1] at morði ‘during the onslaught’: Lit. ‘in battle’. Kock (NN §972B) suggests taking this prepositional phrase with the first cl. (‘Magnús had to fall during the onslaught in battle’). That reading causes an awkward duplication but a more straightforward w. o. — [3-4] ríkr þjóðkonungr réð fyr slíkum dauða ræsis ‘the powerful, mighty king caused such a death of the ruler’: Again, not quite in keeping with the actual events (see Note to st. 1/5, 8 above). — [5, 8] meir nauðr, an skyldi ‘a greater need than should have been [necessary]’: This statement is somewhat obscure, but must refer to the fact that the counsellors of Haraldr’s sons were forced to resort to excessive measures to stop the rampage of Sigurðr slembir and Magnús in 1139. Hkr (ÍF 28, 314-15) and Mork (1928-32, 429-30) describe in detail the deliberations which took place prior to the campaign that culminated in the battle of Holmengrå. — [7-8] fylldan flestan (m. acc. sg.) ‘sated many’: The emendation (from dat. to acc.) is necessary from the point of view of syntax and is in keeping with earlier eds.

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