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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Note to stanza

3. Anonymous Lausavísur, 3. Stanzas from Snorra Edda, 16 [Vol. 3, 528]

[1] Haki: For this legendary king, see Note to RvHbreiðm Hl 27 [All] and Anon (FoGT) 24, 27. Haki was mortally wounded at the epic battle of Fýrisvellir, and Hkr (ÍF 26, 45) gives the following account of his death: Þá lét hann taka skeið, er hann átti, ok lét hlaða dauðum mǫnnum ok vápnum, lét þá flytja út til hafs ok leggja stýri í lag ok draga upp segl, en leggja eld í tyrvið ok gera bál á skipinu. Veðr stóð af landi. Haki var þá at kominn dauða eða dauðr, er hann var lagiðr á bálit. Sigldi skipit síðan loganda út í haf, ok var þetta allfrægt lengi síðan ‘Then he had a warship brought, which he owned, and had it piled up with dead men and weapons. He then had it brought out to sea and the rudder affixed and the sail unfurled, and he had pinewood set on fire and a pyre made on the ship. There was an offshore breeze. Haki was already dead or almost dead when he was placed on the pyre. The ship then sailed out to sea all ablaze, and this event was very famous for a long time afterwards’. See also ÍF 26, 45-6 n. 3.

references

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