Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

login: password: stay logged in: help

Magnús berfœttr Óláfsson (Mberf)

12th century; volume 2; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

Lausavísur (Lv) - 6

Skj info: Magnús berfœttr, Norsk konge, 1093-1103 (AI, 432-3, BI, 402-3).

Skj poems:
Lausavísur

See ‘Royal Biographies’ in Introduction to this volume.

Vol. II. Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: from c. 1035 to c. 1300 > 8. Introduction > 5. Biographies > 1. Royal Biographies > 1. Kings of Norway > i. Magnús III berfœttr Óláfsson (Mberf) (r. 1093-1103)

Saga: Mberf (Ágr, Fsk, H-Hr, Hkr, Mork, Theodoricus).

Magnús berfœttr ‘Barelegs’ Óláfsson, the son of Óláfr kyrri, was king of Norway from 1093-1103 (for a discussion of his nickname, see Note to Anon Nkt 43/1). He died in battle in Ulster, Ireland, on 24 August 1103. See Theodoricus (MHN 59-63; McDougall and McDougall 1998, 49-51), Ágr (ÍF 29, 42-7; Ágr 1995, 60-71), Mork (Mork 1928-32, 297-337; Andersson and Gade 2000, 285-313), Fsk (ÍF 29, 301-15; Finlay 2004, 241-52), Hkr (ÍF 28, 210-37; Hollander 1991, 668-87), H-Hr (Fms 7, 1-73).  See also Orkn (ÍF 34, 92-102, 312-15, 343-4, 346-8; Hermann Pálsson and Edwards 1987, 82-9). For the genealogies of Magnús and his sons, see Genealogies II.2.f and II.3 in ÍF 28.

Events documented in poetry: The joint rule of Magnús and his cousin, Hákon Magnússon, 1093-4 (Anon (Mberf) 1); the uprising against Magnús in 1094, spearheaded by the district chieftain Steigar-Þórir Þórðarson, and the subsequent hanging of the rebels (SteigÞ Kv; Bkrepp Magndr 2-3; Þham Magndr 1 and Lv; Gísl Magnkv 1-8; Anon (Mberf) 2-3); Magnús’s harrying in Halland, in present-day Sweden (c. 1093-5; Bkrepp Magndr 1); his first expedition to the west in 1098, the capture of King Lǫgmaðr Guðrøðarson of the Hebrides and the killing of Earl Hugh of Shrewsbury in the Menai Strait (Mberf Lv 1; Kali Lv; Bkrepp Magndr 5-11; Þham Magndr 2-3; Gísl Magnkv 9-16); Magnús’s campaigns in Sweden against King Ingi Steinkelsson and the battle of Fuxerna (c. 1100-2; Mberf Lv 2; Eldj Lv 1-2; Þham Magndr 4; Gísl Magnkv 17-20; Anon (Mberf) 4-5); Magnús’s second expedition to the west and his death in Ulster in 1103 (Þham Magndr 5). Two anonymous lausavísur describe Magnús’s sailing (Anon (Mberf) 6-7) and his life is chronicled in Anon Nkt 42-4, 66-7. In addition to the two lausavísur mentioned above (Mberf Lv 1-2), another four stanzas are attributed to Magnús (Mberf Lv 3-6), describing his love for two women (Matilda and an unknown Irish woman).

Lausavísur — Mberf LvII

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Magnús berfœttr Óláfsson, Lausavísur’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 385-90.

 1   2   3   4   5   6 

Skj: Magnús berfœttr: Lausavísur (AI, 432-3, BI, 402-3)

in texts: Flat, Fsk, H-Hr, Mork, Orkn

SkP info: II, 385-90

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance references search files

 

1 Auð hefk minn, þanns mǫnnum
margteitum réðk veita,
— húf létk kløkkvan klífa
kolgur — illa folginn.
I have invested my wealth, which I gave to my most cheerful men, unwisely; I let the flexible hull climb the breakers.
2 Villat * flokk várn fylla?
Falsk riddari inn valski?
Does he not wish to complete our company? Was the Norman knight hiding?
3 Sús ein, es mér meinar,
Maktildr, ok vekr hildi
— már drekkr suðr ór sôrum
sveita — leik ok teiti.
Sá kennir mér svanni,
sín lǫnd es verr rǫndu,
— sverð bitu Hǫgna hurðir —
hvítjarpr sofa lítit.
There is one, Maktildr, who denies me fun and pleasure and stirs up strife; in the south the seagull of gore [RAVEN/EAGLE] drinks from wounds. That lady with the light-brown hair, who defends her lands with the shield, teaches me to sleep but little; swords bit the doors of Hǫgni <legendary hero> [SHIELDS].
4 Hvats í heimi betra
— hyggr skald af þrô sjaldan —
— mjǫks langr, sás dvelr drengi,
dagr — an víf in fǫgru?
Þungan berk af þingi
þann harm, es skalk svanna
— skreytask menn á móti —
minn aldrigi finna.
What’s better in this world than fair women? The poet seldom forgets his yearning; the day which delays men is very long. I carry that heavy care from the assembly, that I shall never meet my woman; men dress up at the meeting.
5 Jǫrp mun eigi verpa
arm-Hlín* á glæ sínum;
orð spyrk gollhrings Gerðar
góð of skald í hljóði.
Annk, þótt eigi finnak
opt, goðvefjar þoptu;
viti menn, at hykk hennar
hôla rœkðarmôlum.
The brown-haired Hlín <goddess> of the arm [WOMAN] will not throw away her [words] to no avail; I hear in secret the kind words of the Gerðr <goddess> of the gold ring [WOMAN] about the skald. I love the thwart of precious cloth [WOMAN], although I don’t often meet [her]; let men know that I think very highly of her caring comments.
6 Hvat skulum heimfǫr kvitta?
Hugrs minn í Dyflinni,
enn til Kaupangs kvinna
kømkat austr í hausti.
Unik, þvít eigi synjar
ingjan gamansþinga;
œrskan veldr, þvít írskum
annk betr an mér svanna.
Why should we talk of the journey home? My heart is in Dublin, and I shall not return east to the women of Trondheim this autumn. I am content, because the girl does not deny me meetings of pleasure; youth causes [it], for I love the Irish woman better than myself.
© Skaldic Project Academic Body, unless otherwise noted. Database structure and interface developed by Tarrin Wills. All users of material on this database are reminded that its content may be either subject to copyright restrictions or is the property of the custodians of linked databases that have given permission for members of the skaldic project to use their material for research purposes. Those users who have been given access to as yet unpublished material are further reminded that they may not use, publish or otherwise manipulate such material except with the express permission of the individual editor of the material in question and the General Editor of the volume in which the material is to be published. Applications for permission to use such material should be made in the first instance to the General Editor of the volume in question. All information that appears in the published volumes has been thoroughly reviewed. If you believe some information here is incorrect please contact Tarrin Wills with full details.