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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Poem about Haraldr harðráði — Ill HarII

Illugi bryndœlaskáld

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Illugi bryndœlaskáld, Poem about Haraldr harðráði’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 282-5.

 

Vargs vas munr, þats margan
— menskerðir stakk sverði
myrkaurriða markar —
minn dróttinn rak flótta.
 
‘It was the pleasure of the wolf that my lord put many to flight; the necklace-diminisher [GENEROUS MAN = Sigurðr] pierced the dark trout of the forest [SERPENT = Fáfnir] with the sword.
Enn helt ulfa brynnir
— eiskaldi gramr beisku
mildr réð orms of eldi —
austrfǫr þaðan gǫrva.
 
‘Again the thirst-quencher of wolves [WARRIOR] embarked on a well-prepared expedition eastward; the generous ruler moved the bitter heart of the snake across the fire.
Opt gekk á frið Frakka
— fljótreitt at bý snótar
vasa dǫglingi duglum —
dróttinn minn fyr óttu.
 
‘Often my lord destroyed the peace of the Normans before dawn; it was not a speedy ride for the capable ruler to the residence of the woman.
Brauzt und Míkjál mæztan
— môgum heim, sem frôgum,
sonr Buðla bauð sínum —
sunnlǫnd, Haraldr, rǫndu.
 
‘Haraldr, you subjugated the southern lands with the shield for most esteemed Michael; Buðli’s son [= Atli] invited his brothers-in-law home, as we [I] have heard.
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