MUFI Character Database

login: password: stay logged in: help

Number of characters in database: 1530

Search:
Browse by character:

 - combining   - formatting   - geometrical   - metrical   - numbers   - punctuation   - spacing   - symbols   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   Þ   ȝ 

Browse by range:

 0000   0100   0200   0300   1000   1600   1D00   1E00   2000   2100   2200   2300   2500   2700   2A00   2C00   2E00   A700   AB00   E000   E100   E200   E300   E400   E500   E600   E700   E800   EA00   EB00   EE00   EF00   F000   F100   F200   F400   F700   FB00   10100 

Browse by code chart:

 AlphPresForm   AncSymb   Arrows   BasLat   CombDiaMk   CombDiaMkS   CurrSymb   Dingbats   GenPunct   GeomShap   Georgian   GkCo   IPAExt   Lat1Suppl   LatExtA   LatExtAdd   LatExtB   LatExtC   LatExtD   LatExtE   LettSymb   MathOp   MiMaSymbA   MiscTech   NumbFo   PhonExt   PUA-1   PUA-10   PUA-11   PUA-12   PUA-13   PUA-15   PUA-16   PUA-17   PUA-18   PUA-19   PUA-2   PUA-20   PUA-21   PUA-22   PUA-23   PUA-24   PUA-25   PUA-26   PUA-27   PUA-28   PUA-29   PUA-3   PUA-30   PUA-31   PUA-32   PUA-33   PUA-34   PUA-35   PUA-36   PUA-37   PUA-38   PUA-39   PUA-4   PUA-40   PUA-41   PUA-42   PUA-43   PUA-44   PUA-45   PUA-46   PUA-47   PUA-48   PUA-5   PUA-51   PUA-6   PUA-7   PUA-8   PUA-9   PUA-var   Run   SpModLet   SupplMathOp   SupplPunct   SupSub 

Supplemental Punctuation

Twenty-one characters have been selected from this range, which contains 49 characters in the Unicode Standard v. 5.1. The Unicode descriptive names for these characters, especially for the first one, can be misleading. For the remaining three half square brackets, see the Private Use Area, subrange 9 below (p. 129).

Glyph EntityNumericCodepoint ChartDescriptionVersion Andron
2E00&luhsqbNT;⸀2E00SupplPunctRIGHT ANGLE SUBSTITUTION MARKERUni.:
MUFI: 4.0 auto
This character was interpreted as a half bracket in v. 2.0 of the MUFI character recommendation. However, since the whole set of half brackets were introduced in the Unicode Standard v. 5.1, these should be used rather than the present speci c New Testament editorial symbol. See 2E22–2E25 below (p. 73). The recommended MUFI entity has been changed from ‘&luhsqb;’ to ‘&luhsqbNT;’. The entity ‘&luhsqb;’ is now being used for 2E22 (p. 73). [LEFT UPPER HALF SQUARE BRACKET]
2E0C&luslst;⸌2E0CSupplPunctLEFT UPPER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is LEFT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET, but the more general LEFT UPPER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the beginning of text added above the line. This character was interpreted as a half bracket in v. 2.0 of the MUFI character recommendation. However, since the whole set of half brackets were in- troduced in the Unicode Standard v. 5.1, these should be used rather than this specific New Testament editorial symbol. See 2E22–2E25 below (p. 76). The recommended MUFI entity has been changed from ‘&luhsqb;’ to ‘&luhsqbNT;’. The entity ‘&luhsqb;’ is now being used for 2E22 (see below).
2E0D&ruslst;⸍2E0DSupplPunctRIGHT UPPER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is RIGHT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET, but the more general RIGHT UPPER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the end of text added above the line.
2E17&dbloblhyph;⸗2E17SupplPunctDOUBLE OBLIQUE HYPHENUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E1C&rlslst;⸜2E1CSupplPunctRIGHT LOWER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is LEFT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET, but the more general name RIGHT LOWER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the end of text added in the margin and is for this reason called ‘RIGHT’ (by analogy with e.g. 0029 RIGHT PARENTHESIS).
2E1D&llslst;⸝2E1DSupplPunctLEFT LOWER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is RIGHT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET, but the more general name LEFT LOWER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the beginning of text added in the margin and is for this reason called ‘LEFT’ (by analogy with e.g. 0028 LEFT PARENTHESIS).
2E20&verbarqr;⸠2E20SupplPunctRIGHT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
This pair of brackets is used to indicate dittography (left bar with quill, then right bar with quill) or erasure by the scribe (right bar with quill, then left bar with quill) in many critical editions of Old Norse texts.
2E21&verbarql;⸡2E21SupplPunctLEFT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E22&luhsqb;⸢2E22SupplPunctTOP LEFT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E23&ruhsqb;⸣2E23SupplPunctTOP RIGHT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E24&llhsqb;⸤2E24SupplPunctBOTTOM LEFT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E25&rlhsqb;⸥2E25SupplPunctBOTTOM RIGHT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E26&lUbrack;⸦2E26SupplPunctLEFT SIDEWAYS U BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E27&rUbrack;⸧2E27SupplPunctRIGHT SIDEWAYS U BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
This pair of brackets is used to indicate Claudian letters.
2E28&ldblpar;⸨2E28SupplPunctLEFT DOUBLE PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E29&rdblpar;⸩2E29SupplPunctRIGHT DOUBLE PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E2A&tridotsdownw;⸪2E2ASupplPunctTWO DOTS OVER ONE DOT PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2235 BECAUSE in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2B&tridotsupw;⸫2E2BSupplPunctONE DOT OVER TWO DOTS PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2234 THEREFORE in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2C&quaddots;⸬2E2CSupplPunctFOUR DOTS PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2237 PROPORTION in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2D&fivedots;⸭2E2DSupplPunctFIVE DOT MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E2E&punctpercont;⸮2E2ESupplPunctREVERSED QUESTION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like a horizontally flipped (i.e. reversed) modern question mark, called PUNCTUS PERCONTATIVUS. Used in late texts to mark the end of a question that does not require an answer (i.e. a rhetorical question), as opposed to the PUNCTUS INTERROGATIVUS.
2E40&dblhyph;⹀2E40SupplPunctDOUBLE HYPHENUni.:
MUFI: 4.0
© 2001-2016 MUFI Board. Disclaimer: This site is managed by scholars in Medieval studies with the aim of establishing a consensus on the use of Unicode among medievalists. It is not affiliated with or endorsed by Unicode.