MUFI Character Database

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Number of characters in database: 1530

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Glyph EntityNumericCodepoint ChartDescriptionVersion Andron
00B7··00B7Lat1SupplMIDDLE DOTUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
·
A high dot, F1F8 DISTINCTIO, is listed in the section on Medieval punctuation p. 145 below.
2027&hyphpoint;‧2027GenPunctHYPHENATION POINTUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2024&sgldr;․2024GenPunctONE DOT LEADERUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2025&dblldr;‥2025GenPunctTWO DOT LEADERUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
..
Most likely by mistake, two entities, ‘‥’ (“en leader”) and ‘…’ (“em leader”), have been recorded for 2025 TWO DOT LEADER in the survey of ISO-conformant entities published on the Oasis web site (cf. p. 7 above).
003A::003ABasLatCOLONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
:
002C,,002CBasLatCOMMAUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
,
10FB&tridotright;჻10FB
Junicode: F162
GeorgianGEORGIAN PARAGRAPH SEPARATORUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
PUNCTUATION MARK RIGHT-POINTING TRIANGULAR DOTS — Also used as a punctuation mark in languages other than Georgian.
2234&tridotupw;∴2234MathOpTHEREFOREUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
For this character, the ISO entity name ‘∴’ has been supplanted with ‘&tridotupw;’.
2235&tridotdw;∵2235MathOpBECAUSEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
PUNCTUATION MARK DOWNWARDS- POINTING TRIANGULAR DOTS — This character can also be used as a punctuation mark, but we recommend F1EE in the Private Use Area (p. 128 below) as a punctuation character.
2237&quaddot;∷2237MathOpPROPORTIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
PUNCTUATION MARK FOUR DOTS — This character can also be used as a punctuation mark, but we recommend F1ED in the Private Use Area (p. 128 below) as a punctuation character.
2058&lozengedot;⁘2058GenPunctFOUR DOT PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
F1DA&midring;F1DAPUA-9MIDDLE RINGUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Vertical and oblique bars
007C||007CBasLatVERTICAL LINEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
|
00A6¦¦00A6Lat1SupplBROKEN BARUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
¦
2016‖‖2016GenPunctDOUBLE VERTICAL LINEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
002F//002FBasLatSOLIDUSUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
/
2044&fracsol;⁄2044GenPunctFRACTION SLASHUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2AFD&dblsol;⫽2AFDSupplMathOpPUNCTUATION MARK DOUBLE SOLIDUSUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode name is DOUBLE SOLIDUS OPERATOR, but by analogy with similar punctuation marks, a more general name has been chosen here. This character can be used as a punctuation mark in addition to the single solidus, 002F in Basic Latin (p. 15 above). Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Ef- fect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 301.
005C\\005CBasLatREVERSE SOLIDUSUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
\
2E0C&luslst;⸌2E0CSupplPunctLEFT UPPER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is LEFT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET, but the more general LEFT UPPER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the beginning of text added above the line. This character was interpreted as a half bracket in v. 2.0 of the MUFI character recommendation. However, since the whole set of half brackets were in- troduced in the Unicode Standard v. 5.1, these should be used rather than this specific New Testament editorial symbol. See 2E22–2E25 below (p. 76). The recommended MUFI entity has been changed from ‘&luhsqb;’ to ‘&luhsqbNT;’. The entity ‘&luhsqb;’ is now being used for 2E22 (see below).
2E0D&ruslst;⸍2E0DSupplPunctRIGHT UPPER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is RIGHT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET, but the more general RIGHT UPPER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the end of text added above the line.
2E1C&rlslst;⸜2E1CSupplPunctRIGHT LOWER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is LEFT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET, but the more general name RIGHT LOWER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the end of text added in the margin and is for this reason called ‘RIGHT’ (by analogy with e.g. 0029 RIGHT PARENTHESIS).
2E1D&llslst;⸝2E1DSupplPunctLEFT LOWER SLANTED STROKEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is RIGHT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET, but the more general name LEFT LOWER SLANTED STROKE has been chosen here. In Medieval Nordic editing it is typically used to indicate the beginning of text added in the margin and is for this reason called ‘LEFT’ (by analogy with e.g. 0028 LEFT PARENTHESIS).
005F__005FBasLatLOW LINEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
_
002D‐-002DBasLatHYPHEN-MINUSUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
-
As the name HYPHEN-MINUS indicates, this character is ambiguous. For an unambiguous hyphen character, see 2010 HYPHEN in General Punctuation, and for an unambiguous minus character, see 2212 MINUS in Mathematical Operators.
2010‐‐2010GenPunctHYPHENUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
This is an unambiguous hyphen character.
2011&nbhy;‑2011GenPunctNON-BREAKING HYPHENUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E17&dbloblhyph;⸗2E17SupplPunctDOUBLE OBLIQUE HYPHENUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2013––2013GenPunctEN DASHUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2014——2014GenPunctEM DASHUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2015――2015GenPunctHORIZONTAL BARUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Question marks, exclamation marks and other complex signs
0021!!0021BasLatEXCLAMATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
!
00A1¡¡00A1Lat1SupplINVERTED EXCLAMATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
¡
003F??003FBasLatQUESTION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
?
00BF¿¿00BFLat1SupplINVERTED QUESTION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
¿
F1DB&ramus;F1DBPUA-9PALM BRANCHUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
0028((0028BasLatLEFT PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
(
0029))0029BasLatRIGHT PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
)
2E26&lUbrack;⸦2E26SupplPunctLEFT SIDEWAYS U BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E27&rUbrack;⸧2E27SupplPunctRIGHT SIDEWAYS U BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
This pair of brackets is used to indicate Claudian letters.
2E28&ldblpar;⸨2E28SupplPunctLEFT DOUBLE PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E29&rdblpar;⸩2E29SupplPunctRIGHT DOUBLE PARENTHESISUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
005B[[005BBasLatLEFT SQUARE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
[
005D]]005DBasLatRIGHT SQUARE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
]
007B{{007BBasLatLEFT CURLY BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
{
007D}}007DBasLatRIGHT CURLY BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
}
2045&lsqbqu;⁅2045GenPunctLEFT SQUARE BRACKET WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2046&rsqbqu;⁆2046GenPunctRIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
27E6&lwhsqb;⟦27E6MiMaSymbALEFT WHITE SQUARE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is MATHEMATICAL LEFT WHITE SQUARE BRACKET, but the word ‘MATHEMATICAL’ has been left out here.
27E7&rwhsqb;⟧27E7MiMaSymbARIGHT WHITE SQUARE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is MATHEMATICAL RIGHT WHITE SQUARE BRACKET, but the word ‘MATHEMATICAL’ has been left out here.
2E21&verbarql;⸡2E21SupplPunctLEFT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E20&verbarqr;⸠2E20SupplPunctRIGHT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILLUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
This pair of brackets is used to indicate dittography (left bar with quill, then right bar with quill) or erasure by the scribe (right bar with quill, then left bar with quill) in many critical editions of Old Norse texts.
2E22&luhsqb;⸢2E22SupplPunctTOP LEFT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E23&ruhsqb;⸣2E23SupplPunctTOP RIGHT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E24&llhsqb;⸤2E24SupplPunctBOTTOM LEFT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2E25&rlhsqb;⸥2E25SupplPunctBOTTOM RIGHT HALF BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
0027''0027BasLatAPOSTROPHEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
'
A sign looking like the apostrophe was used as an abbreviation for ‘i’ or ‘e’. Cf. D.A. Seip, Palæografi: Norge og Island (Nordisk kultur 23:B), Oslo etc. 1954, p. 125. In such cases, we recommend that the character 02BC LATIN ABBREVIATION SIGN APOSTROPHE in section 4 above should be used.
2032′′2032GenPunctPRIMEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
0022""0022BasLatQUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
"
In SGML/XML encoded documents, the quotation mark is used to delimit attributes. The entity ‘"’ refers to the quotation mark as such.
2033″″2033GenPunctDOUBLE PRIMEUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
′′
2018‘‘2018GenPunctLEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2019’’2019GenPunctRIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The entity ‘’’ is also being used for this character. An analogous variant to 2018, ‘‚’, has not been included in the survey of ISO-conformant entities published on the Oasis web site (cf. p. 7 above).
201A&lsquolow;‚201AGenPunctSINGLE LOW-9 QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
MUFI: &lsquolow;. The final ‘r’ in the ISO entity name ‘‚’ is ambiguous, since it is otherwise being used for raised quotation marks, such as 201B and 201F. For this reason, the suffix ‘low’ has been used in the recommended MUFI entity.
201B&rsquorev;‛201BGenPunctSINGLE HIGH-REVERSED-9 QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
201C““201CGenPunctLEFT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
201D””201DGenPunctRIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The entity ‘”’ is also being used for this character. An analogous variant to 201C, ‘„’, has not been included in the survey of ISO-confor- mant entities published on the Oasis web site (cf. p. 7 above).
201E&ldquolow;„201EGenPunctDOUBLE LOW-9 QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
&ldquolow; — The final ‘r’ in the ISO entity name ‘„’ is ambiguous, because it is used elsewhere for raised quotation marks, such as 201B and 201F. For this rea- son, the suffix ‘low’ has been used in the recommended MUFI entity.
201F&rdquorev;‟201FGenPunctDOUBLE HIGH-REVERSED-9 QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
2039‹‹2039GenPunctSINGLE LEFT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The entity ‘«’ is also being used for this character, but has here been reserved for 00AB in Latin-1 Supplement (p. 23 above).
00AB««00ABLat1SupplLEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
«
003C<<003CBasLatLESS-THAN SIGNUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
<
In SGML/XML encoded doccuments, the less-than sign is used as the opening character of an element name, e.g. . To be able to refer to the less-than sign as such, a separate entity is needed, ‘<’.
27E8&langb;&#10216;27E8MiMaSymbALEFT ANGLE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is MATHEMATICAL LEFT ANGLE BRACKET, but the word ‘MATHEMATICAL’ has been left out here. This bracket is typi- cally used to indicate the beginning of an editorial addition (supplied text).
203A&rsaquo;&#8250;203AGenPunctSINGLE RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The entity ‘&raquo;’ is also being used for this character, but has here been reserved for 00BB in Latin-1 Supplement (p. 24 above).
003E&gt;&#62;003EBasLatGREATER-THAN SIGNUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
>
In SGML/XML encoded doccuments, the greater-than sign is used as a closing character of an element name, e.g. . To be able to refer to the greater- than sign as such, a separate entity is needed, ‘>’.
00BB&raquo;&#187;00BBLat1SupplRIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
»
27E9&rangb;&#10217;27E9MiMaSymbARIGHT ANGLE BRACKETUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode descriptive name is MATHEMATICAL RIGHT ANGLE BRACKET, but the word ‘MATHEMATICAL’ has been left out here. This bracket is typi- cally used to indicate the end of an editorial addition (supplied text).
F1F8&hidot;&#61944;F1F8PUA-8DISTINCTIOUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Described by the grammarian Donatus, who distinguishes between three positions of the dot: on the baseline (to be unified with 002E FULL STOP), middle height (to be unified with 00B7 MIDDLE DOT) and the high dot, shown here. See also Isidore of Sevilla, Etymologiae I 20. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 13, says that the distinctio was used to indicate “a final pause, after a periodus, or where the sententia is completed”.
F1E2&posit;&#61922;F1E2PUA-8COMMA POSITURAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
The positura is similar to COMMA 002C, but should be kept apart from this punctuation mark due to a different and more specialised usage. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 306.
F1E3&ductsimpl;&#61923;F1E3PUA-8HIGH COMMA POSITURA (SIMPLEX DUCTUS)Uni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Similar form as the positura, but positioned above the ‘x’ height. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 307.
F1EA&punctvers;&#61930;F1EAPUA-8PUNCTUS VERSUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Similar in shape to the semicolon (003B), but should be kept apart from this mark. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301, 306.
F1E4&punctposit;&#61924;F1E4PUA-8PUNCTUS WITH COMMA POSITURAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 306.
F1E5&colmidcomposit;&#61925;F1E5PUA-8COLON WITH MIDDLE COMMA POSITURAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 306.
F1F2&bidotscomposit;&#61938;F1F2PUA-8TWO DOTS OVER COMMA POSITURAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Attested in Old Icelandic, e.g. in Holm perg 15 B 4to (see Hreinn Benediktsson, Early Icelandic Script, Reykjavík 1965, pl. 8:14) and in GKS 2365 4to (Codex Regius of the Eddic poems).
F1E6&tridotscomposit;&#61926;F1E6PUA-8THREE DOTS WITH COMMA POSITURAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
This punctuation mark looks like an upwards-poiting triangle of dots with a comma between (and below) the two lower dots. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 307. See also 2234 above in Mathematical Operators.
F161&punctelev;&#61793;F161PUA-8PUNCTUS ELEVATUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
This form of the punctus elevatus is typically found in English manuscripts and is sometimes seen as the default form. Sometimes called ‘tick and point’, e.g. by N.R. Ker, English Manuscripts in the Century after the Norman Conquest, Oxford, 1960, p. 46.
F1F0&punctelevdiag;&#61936;F1F0PUA-8PUNCTUS ELEVATUS DIAGONAL STROKEUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Variant form of the punctus elevatus.
F1FA&punctelevhiback;&#61946;F1FAPUA-8PUNCTUS ELEVATUS WITH HIGH BACKUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Variant form of the punctus elevatus found in manuscripts in the Low countries, eastern France and the Rhineland.
F1FB&punctelevhack;&#61947;F1FBPUA-8PUNCTUS ELEVATUS WITH ONSETUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Variant form of the punctus elevatus found in manuscripts from southern Germany.
F1F5&punctflex;&#61941;F1F5PUA-8PUNCTUS FLEXUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like the digit 7 with a dot below, sometimes referred to as ‘seven and point’ (e.g. by N.R. Ker, English Manuscripts in the Century after the Norman Conquest, Oxford, 1960, p. 47). Also called PUNCTUS CIRCUMFLEXUS. Used to mark sentence-medial pauses, especially in liturgical texts where the pitch of the voice drops. Cf. also Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301, 306. Note that the shape in Parkes’ book looks more like an open ‘a’ than ‘7’, but this is basically a question of variance.
F1E7&punctexclam;&#61927;F1E7PUA-8PUNCTUS EXCLAMATIVUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Early form with two dots below each other and a diagonal stroke on top of them. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 301.
F160&punctinter;&#61792;F160PUA-8PUNCTUS INTERROGATIVUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
F1E8&punctintertilde;&#61928;F1E8PUA-8PUNCTUS INTERROGATIVUS HORIZONTAL TILDEUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
This is a variant of the question mark where the swash (tilde) is horizontal. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 301.
F1F1&punctinterlemn;&#61937;F1F1PUA-8PUNCTUS INTERROGATIVUS LEMNISKATE FORMUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Attested in Old Icelandic, but very marginal. For examples, see Holm perg 15 B 4to (cf. Hreinn Benediktsson, Early Icelandic Script, Reykjavík 1965, pl. 8:13 and 8:19).
2E2E&punctpercont;&#11822;2E2ESupplPunctREVERSED QUESTION MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like a horizontally flipped (i.e. reversed) modern question mark, called PUNCTUS PERCONTATIVUS. Used in late texts to mark the end of a question that does not require an answer (i.e. a rhetorical question), as opposed to the PUNCTUS INTERROGATIVUS.
F1F9&wavylin;&#61945;F1F9PUA-8WAVY LINEUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Frequently used in English manuscripts in the 12th century in the form of a wavy line or sometimes a straight line. Placed slightly above the base line.
F1E0&medcom;&#61920;F1E0PUA-8MEDIEVAL COMMAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 301. According to Parkes, this mark “appears most frequently in the work of fourteenth- century Italian scribes” (p. 303).
F1E1&parag;&#61921;F1E1PUA-8PARAGRAPHUSUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 12, 43, 305.
F1EC&renvoi;&#61932;F1ECPUA-8SIGNE DE RENVOIUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like two dots over a single dot. Used to connect a marginal note to a place in the text. Looks similar to TWO DOTS OVER ONE DOT PUNCTUATION below, but has a different usage and the dots are more widely spaced.
2E2A&tridotsdownw;&#11818;2E2ASupplPunctTWO DOTS OVER ONE DOT PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2235 BECAUSE in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2B&tridotsupw;&#11819;2E2BSupplPunctONE DOT OVER TWO DOTS PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2234 THEREFORE in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2C&quaddots;&#11820;2E2CSupplPunctFOUR DOTS PUNCTUATIONUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
Similar to 2237 PROPORTION in Mathematical Operators, but should be recognised as a separate punctuation character and given its own code point.
2E2D&fivedots;&#11821;2E2DSupplPunctFIVE DOT MARKUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
F1F4&virgsusp;&#61940;F1F4PUA-8VIRGULA SUSPENSIVAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like a solidus with a dot in the middle. Used to mark a very brief pause or hesitation in the text. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, p. 307.
F1F7&virgmin;&#61943;F1F7PUA-8SHORT VIRGULAUni.:
MUFI: 3.0
Looks like a virgule, but confined within the ‘x’ height (like a half-height slash), e.g. ‘x  x’. Attested in late paper manuscripts of Medieval Nordic verse and not to be unified with the ordinary comma.
22D7&dipledot;&#8919;22D7MathOpGREATER-THAN WITH DOTUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
DIPLE WITH DOT — The Unicode name for this character is GREATER-THAN WITH DOT, but it can also be used as a punctuation mark and is therefore given another name here, DIPLE WITH DOT. Cf. Malcolm B. Parkes, Pause and Effect, Aldershot, 1992, pp. 301 and 303.
2012&numdash;&#8210;2012GenPunctFIGURE DASHUni.: 5.1
MUFI: 3.0
The Unicode character 2012 FIGURE DASH can also be used as an encoding for METRICAL LONGUM. We recommend retaining the entity name ‘&numdash;’ also in this context.
2056&tridotleft;&#8278;2056GenPunctTHREE DOT PUNCTUATIONUni.:
MUFI: 4.0
2E40&dblhyph;&#11840;2E40SupplPunctDOUBLE HYPHENUni.:
MUFI: 4.0
2026&hellip;&#8230;2026GenPunctHORIZONTAL ELLIPSISUni.:
MUFI: 4.0 auto
2E00&luhsqbNT;&#11776;2E00SupplPunctRIGHT ANGLE SUBSTITUTION MARKERUni.:
MUFI: 4.0 auto
This character was interpreted as a half bracket in v. 2.0 of the MUFI character recommendation. However, since the whole set of half brackets were introduced in the Unicode Standard v. 5.1, these should be used rather than the present speci c New Testament editorial symbol. See 2E22–2E25 below (p. 73). The recommended MUFI entity has been changed from ‘&luhsqb;’ to ‘&luhsqbNT;’. The entity ‘&luhsqb;’ is now being used for 2E22 (p. 73). [LEFT UPPER HALF SQUARE BRACKET]
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